A Eureka Park Inventor Unlike Any Other

As you comb through Eureka Park at CES® 2018, you can discover the next set of game-changing technologies before they make it big—or meet the next wave of tech leaders before they become market movers. But look closely among the more than 900 startups from around the world, and you’ll find an inventor unlike any other – one who’s already had a quite a career.

Carol Staninger is the president of ANCER, LLC, a company based in Florida. She’s a passionate advocate for the welfare of children, after spending decades in the medical administrative field. She’s a fan of Popular Mechanics, Popular Science and Scientific American. And she’s not only exhibiting, but attending her first-ever CES.

Oh, and Carol is also 82-years-old.

“When I first became interested in science and technology, I thought CES was a fascinating place to go—but I never actually went,” says Staninger. “You read so much about it every January. I just never followed through and attended a show.”

So, why come to CES now? After seeing news story after news story about children and dogs accidentally left in hot cars, Carol decided she could make a difference—through technology.

She knew NASA could track astronauts’ wellness without being too intrusive, so Carol worked on a way to track the breathing of people and pets and sound an alarm if something were wrong. But Carol herself says her STEM training adds up to “absolutely none,” so she needed help moving from idea to invention.

While watching the local news, Carol saw a story featuring Charles Ferrer, president and CEO of Florida-based CMS Worldgroup. The two arranged a meeting, struck a deal, decided on a sensor-based device and found a manufacturing partner.

“We went from there, figuring out this step and that step,” says Staninger. “Finally, we got a prototype and we tested it out. So then, Charles decided we better go to CES, because it’s the place to go for consumer technology innovations!”

The result – a car alarm called Save Our Loved Ones (SOLO) to prevent children, seniors and the disabled from being left too long in hot cars. As for getting to market, the pair connected with longtime consumer technology veteran Ron Freeman, CEO of Instrument Sales & Service (ISS).

“First I thought, what a great product—and then, what an incredible story!” says Freeman. “After her own successful career in the medical field, Carol has committed her time to solving this problem and saving lives. I think her innovation will be a big hit in Eureka Park!”

And Carol’s goal for CES 2018 (other than seeing as much innovative tech as possible)?

“I would like to have somebody buy the company,” says Staninger. “Our innovation can go into every vehicle worldwide—it’s not dependent on one single brand or auto manufacturer. I’d love to see SOLO in every single car!”
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